reading

The Reading Test: Parents, What Do Those Informal Classroom Reading Test Scores Mean?

PART 2: Reading Tests & Parent Involvement: Informal Reading Test Assessments/Screens. Reading is a learned skill.  We are not born with the natural ability to read! Parents, Are you receiving any progress reports, other than report cards, from your child’s teacher about their reading ability level? How often does your child’s teacher communicate about your child’s …

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The Reading Test: Parents, What Do Those Standardized Reading Test Scores Mean?

PART 1: Reading Tests and Parent Involvement:  Standardized Tests. Reading is a learned skill.  We are not born with the natural ability to read!   Okay parents, you have received results for your child’s ‘standardized’ reading test scores.  Now what? What do they mean? What can you do? Here are some insights that I hope …

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Reading Skills increase with movement

Reading Skills Increase with Movement

Reading skills increase with movement.   Winter is taking its toll.  Snow piled up, schools closed, and some of the coldest temperatures on record!  Are your kids suffering from cabin fever?  How are their reading skills?  Keep them moving.  Research has shown that movement aids in cognitive processing and focus. Ask a ballerina.  My daughter …

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Exercise your child’s learning brain

Exercise Your Child’s Learning Brain and Develop Reading Skills

Exercise your child’s learning brain and develop reading skills using tracing. Tracing is great visual perception and motor skill practice which helps build reading skills. Tracing develops the hand-eye coordination needed for reading and writing and the fine motor skills for writing.  Tracing also exercises their ‘eye for detail’ which aids in decoding and comprehension. …

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Are You Game? Reading Skills Game 2

Here is another game to help your child learn to read and strengthen their reading skills! Game 2:  Follow the Light!  Ages 4 and up. This game is great for developing the ‘bilateralism’ capabilities of the brain.  This is a necessary brain function for reading skills because scientists have shown that reading involves both hemispheres …

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Why does reading aloud help my child to read

Why Does Reading Aloud Help my Child Learn to Read?

“The single most important activity for building the knowledge required for eventual success in reading is reading aloud to children.” — Becoming a Nation of Readers a U.S. Department of Education Report, 1985 Why does reading aloud help my child learn to read? The two main doors for words to get into our brain is …

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IQ not predictor reading comprehension

IQ is Not a Strong Predictor of Reading Comprehension Success

IQ is not a strong predictor of reading comprehension success. In fact, many research studies have determined that IQ does not directly correlate to reading achievement.  There are two factors that contribute greatly to reading difficulties and each contains multiple ‘signs’ for reading challenges.   The two factors are ‘biological/neurological’ and ‘environmental’.  KEEP IN MIND that …

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5 Ways to Make Reading Fun: Help your Child Learn to Read

Here are some great activities that help your child learn the fun of reading.  They are presented for young children [ages 4-6] but with your creative adjustments, they work for older children also [ages 7-9] 1-Have your child design their own bookmark.  Trace around an existing bookmark for a template, go on the internet, or …

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